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Top 25 Low Level Laser Therapy Protocols and Research

Top 25 Low Level Laser Therapy Protocols and Research

Low Level Laser Therapy for Sacroiliac Joint Pain

Case Study: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) for patients with sacroiliac joint pain

Laser Treatment Protocols:

The LLLT system used was an 808 nm CW diode laser 1000 mW Laser Therapy Machine, 30 sec/point (20 J/cm2) applied on the bilateral tender points twice/week for 5 weeks.

Conclusions:

LLLT was effective for sacroiliac pain, and this may be due to improvement of the blood circulation of the strong ligaments which support the sacroiliac joint, activation of the descending inhibitory pathway, and the additional removal of irregularities of the sacroiliac joint articular surfaces. 

Clinic Research https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3799023/

Low Level Laser Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Case study: Laser Therapy on patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Background and objective:

The laser acupuncture has many potential therapeutic effects. Currently, they are not evaluated for their therapeutic effects on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients.

Laser Treatment Protocols:

The study was conducted on 30 RA patients and 20 healthy subjects. The patients were subjected to laser acupuncture for 3 days/week for duration of 4 weeks. The acupuncture points of exposure were LI4, TE5, LI 11, DU 14, LIV3, SP6, GB34, and S36.

Conclusion:

Our study results confirmed the effectiveness of laser acupuncture in alleviating oxidative stress and inflammation, improving antioxidant and energy metabolic status, while also suppressing the disease activity in RA patients. Laser acupuncture is a promising treatment modality to reduce the pain and suffering of RA patients because of its efficiency in inhibiting most of the main factors involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:490-497, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Clinic Research https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26875769/

Low-Level Laser Therapy for Cervical Facet Dysfunction

Case Study: Chiropractic Manipulative Therapy and Low-Level Laser Therapy in the Management of Cervical Facet Dysfunction

Methods:

Sixty ambulatory women between the ages of 18 and 40 years with cervical facet joint pain of more than 30-day duration and normal neurologic examination were randomized to receive 1 of 3 treatment options: (1) CMT of the cervical spine, (2) LLLT applied to the cervical facet joints, or (3) a combination of CMT and LLLT. Each participant received 6 treatments in 3 weeks.

Result:

A combination of CMT and LLLT was more effective than either of the 2 on their own.

Clinic Research https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21492750/

Low level laser therapy for TMJ Pain

Case Study: The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of low level laser applied to acupuncture points of patients diagnosed with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Ten patients aged between 20 and 50 years were clinically examined with regard to pain and dysfunction of the masticatory system.

Laser Therapy Protocol

They received laser applications (GaAlAs diode laser, 808 nm wavelength; 70 mW power output, 35 j/cm2) in acupuncture specific points (Ig4, C3, E6, E7) once a week, for ten sessions.

Result:

The laser therapy in specific acupuncture points promoted improvement of symptoms and it may be used as complementary therapy for TMD.

Clinic Research https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20621277/

Laser Therapy for Spastic Cerebral Palsy

Case study: The Effect of Laser Therapy on Spasticity in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

Abstract:

Laser acupuncture is widely used as an alternative line of treatment in several chronic pediatric diseases. To investigate whether biostimulation by low-level laser on acupuncture points adds a clinical benefit to conventional physiotherapy in hemiplegic spastic cerebral palsy (CP) children.

Laser Therapy Treatment Protocols:

Laser acupuncture was applied on GV20, GV14, LI4, GB34, and LR3 (power 50 mW, 785 nm, 1 Joule, 40 seconds) three times a week for 12 sessions in the treatment group

Conclusions:

Laser therapy has a beneficial effect on reducing spasticity in spastic cerebral palsy and may be helpful in improving their movement.

Clinic Research https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32980558/

Low Level Laser Therapy for Depression

Laser Therapy for Depression: A randomised double blind controlled trial using low intensity laser intervention

Laser Therapy Protocols:

Forty-seven participants were randomised to receive laser acupuncture or placebo laser at acupoints LR14, CV14, LR8, HT7 and KI3. The intervention was administered twice a week for 4 weeks and once a week for another four weeks, for a total of 12 sessions.

Results:

At eight weeks participants showed greater improvement in the active laser group on the primary and clinician-rated secondary outcome measures (HAM-D (mean 9.28 (SD 6.55) vs. mean 14.14 (SD 4.78 po0.001); QIDS-CL (mean 8.12 (SD 6.61 versus 12.68 (mean SD 3.77)) p = 0.001). The selfreport QIDS-SR scores improved in both groups but did not differ significantly between the groups. In the active laser group, QIDS-SR scores remained significantly lower than baseline at 3 months follow-up. Response rates (active laser, placebo laser) on ITT (intention to treat) analyses were 72.0 % and 18.2 % (p = 0.001), respectively. Remission rates on ITT analyses (active laser, placebo laser) were 56.0 % and 4.5 % (p = 0.001). Transient fatigue was the only adverse effect reported.

Conclusion:

Laser acupuncture showed a clinically and statistically significant benefit with reducing symptoms of depression on objective measures.

Clinic research https://link.springer.com/article/10.1016/S0415-6412(15)30040-0

Low level laser therapy for Plantar fasciitis

Case study: Low-level laser therapy in the management of plantar fasciitis

Method:

LLLT group received a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser with a 850-nm wavelength for ten sessions, three times a week.

Result:

LLLT group had lower pain than the control group at 3 months (p = 0.03). The combination therapy of LLLT with usual care is more effective to improve functional outcomes and activity-related pain when compared to usual care alone.

Clinical research: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29273892

LLLT/Low Level Laser Therapy for Brain Injuries

Case Study: Our laboratory has conducted three different studies on the effects of LLLT on mice with TBI. 

Conclusion:

The first studied pulsed against continuous laser irradiation, finding that 10 Hz pulsed was the best.

The second compared four different wavelengths, discovering only 660 and 810 nm to have any effectiveness.

The third looked at varying regimens of daily laser treatments (1, 3, and 14 days) and found that 14 laser applications was excessive

The details of clinic research, visit https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5180077/

Laser Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis

Laser therapy protocols:

laser irradiation (two points-medial and lateral side of the left joint; 24 sessions) started 4 weeks after the surgery, 3 days/week for 8 weeks.

Conclusion

These results suggest that exercise training and LLLT were effective in preventing cartilage degeneration and modulating inflammatory process induced by knee OA.

Clinic research https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1063458415012637

Laser Therapy in Knee Osteoarthritis

Case study:Pain Reduction After Laser Acupuncture Treatment in Geriatric Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: a Randomized Controlled Trial

Abstract

To compare the effectiveness of active laser acupuncture with placebo on reducing pain intensity and improving functional outcome in geriatric patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).

Treatment Protocols:

Adopt the 1000mW Laser machine at the ST36 Dubi, ST36 Zusanli, SP9 Yinlingquan, GB34 Yanglingquan, and EX-LE-4 Neixiyan Acupuncture point on the affected knee for ten sessions of treatment, i.e. twice a week. 

Conclusion: active laser acupuncture is effective in reducing pain.

Clinic Research: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27550880/

Laser Therapy for Chronic Tension Headache

Objective:

Headache affects the quality of life for many people throughout the world. Tension headache is among the commonest forms.

Laser Therapy Protocols:

Patients in the treatment group received low energy laser acupuncture to LU7, LI4, GB14, and GB20 bilaterally. Points were irradiated for 43 seconds, and the intensity was 1.3J (approximately 13J/cm2). Ten sessions were given, three per week.

Conclusion:

This study suggests that laser acupuncture may be an effective treatment for chronic tension-type headache

Clinic Research https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15844435/

Laser Therapy for Temporomandibular Disorders

Clinic Research: Laser Acupuncture Therapy (LAT) in Patients With Temporomandibular Disorders

Treatment Protocols:

A GaAlAs laser the laser (808nm 200mW, 30 s per point) was emitted bilaterally on acupuncture points (ST6, ST7, LI4) two times a week for 5 weeks.

Result:

Both LLLT and LAT were effective in reducing pain and increasing excursive and protrusive mandibular motion in TMD patients.

Clinic research https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31396794

Laser Therapy for Low Back Pain

Abstract:

Low power laser has been proved as a pain reducing modality, but there is a lack of studies comparing it with other treatments and also among the Iranian race and society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser on patients with LBP.

Laser Treatment Protocol:

The true laser group received 12 sessions of laser (160 mW) and the control group took 12 sessions of sham laser (the same laser instrument in off status). An infrared laser GaAlAs, wavelength 808 nm, power 160 mw and spot size 1 cm2 and power density 0.16 J/cm2 in continuous mode was used in treatment. We applied the laser to articular spaces of vertebral column, adjacent paravertebral points, pain radiating areas, tender points and also pain-controlling acupuncture points.

Results: 

Of the 40 participants in the study, 6 persons were excluded and thus the data obtained from 34 participants were statistically analyzed. There was significant improvement in pain (P<0.001 for both groups), functional status (Case group: P <0.001; control group: P=0.004) and spinal ROM (Case group: P <0.001; control group: P =0.007) in both groups at the end of the first month, but these gains persisted for 3 months only in the case group (P <0.001). Regarding spinal tenderness, it was disappeared in 89.47% of the patients in the true laser group at the end of one month but remained unchanged in 73.33% of the subjects of the sham laser group. 

Conclusion:

We concluded that laser therapy (in combination with NSAIDs) is an effective and long-lasting therapeutic strategy in bringing relief from LBP without any significant side effect.

Clinic research https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32273951

Low level laser therapy (lllt) for chronic joint pain of the elbow, wrist and fingers

Laser Treatment Protocol

We used a 1000 mW semiconductor laser device. Each tender point and three points around it were irradiated with laser energy. Each point was irradiated twice for 20 s per treatment, giving a total of three minutes for all 4 points. Patients visited the clinic twice a week, and were evaluated after four weeks of treatment.

Results:

All VAS scores were totaled and statistically analyzed. The average VAS score before irradiation was 59.2±12.9, and 33.1±12.2 after the irradiation, showing a significant improvement in VAS score (p<0.001) after treatment. The treatment effect lasted for about one and a half days in the case of wrist pain, epicondylitis lateralis (tennis elbow), and carpal tunnel syndrome. In other pain entities, it lasted for about three to fifteen hours. No change in the range of motion (ROM) was seen in any of the 24 subjects.

Conclusion:

We concluded that LLLT at the wavelength and parameters used in the present study was effective for chronic pain of the elbow, wrist, and fingers.

Clinic Research, visit https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24610977/

Photobiomodulation or Laser therapy for acute SCI ( Spine Cord Injury)

Method;

A 1000mW 808nm Laser was irradiated above the T9 spinal cord of Bama miniature pigs, After daily irradiation with 1000 mW for 14 days, both sides of the irradiated area of the spinal cord were assessed for temperature changes.

Results:

This study might provide a new perspective for clinical applications of PBM in acute SCI.

Clinic research, visit https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31670897

Low Level Laser Therapy for tendon Injuries

Case study: Effects of low-level laser therapy and eccentric exercises in the treatment of recreational athletes with chronic achilles tendinopathy

Laser is the best nonmedicating analgesic for tendon injuries, Used on its own or in combination with traditional treatments, accelerate healing, no side effect, painless.

Laser Therapy Protocol:

Adopted 810nm(808nm) wavelength low level laser irradiate the 6 standard points in each tendon during 30 s in each point, 3J per point e 18J per session 

Clinic research: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18272794

Low-Level Laser Therapy for Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain and tenderness. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT), an emerging nonpharmacological treatment, has been used for relieving musculoskeletal or neuropathic pain.

Conclusions:

Our results provided the most up-to-date and relevant evidence regarding the effects of LLLT in fibromyalgia. LLLT is an effective, safe, and well-tolerated treatment for fibromyalgia.

Clinic research: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31151332/

Laser Therapy/LLLT for Knee OA

Clinic Research

Laser therapy protocols:

laser irradiation (two points-medial and lateral side of the left joint; 24 sessions) started 4 weeks after the surgery, 3 days/week for 8 weeks.

Conclusion

These results suggest that exercise training and LLLT were effective in preventing cartilage degeneration and modulating inflammatory process induced by knee OA.

Clinic research, visit https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1063458415012637

Low-power laser treatment in patients with frozen shoulder

Case study: Low-power laser treatment in patients with frozen shoulder: preliminary results

Abstract:

In this study I sought to test the efficacy of low-power laser therapy (LLLT) in patients with frozen shoulder.

Laser Treatment Protocols:

Sixty-three patients with frozen shoulder were randomly assigned into one of two groups. In the active laser group (n = 31), patients were treated with a 810-nm Ga-Al-As laser with a continuous output of 60 mW applied to eight points on the shoulder for 30 sec each, for a total dose of 1.8 J per point and 14.4 J per session.

The active laser group had the Result:

(1) a significant decrease in overall, night, and activity pain scores at the end of 4 wk and 8 wk of treatment, and at the end of 8 wk additional follow-up (16 wk post-randomization)

(2) a significant decrease in shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI) scores and Croft shoulder disability questionnaire scores at those same intervals;

(3) a significant decrease in disability of arm, shoulder, and hand questionnaire (DASH) scores at the end of 8 wk of treatment, and at 16 wk post-treatment.

Conclusions:

The results suggested that laser treatment was more effective in reducing pain and disability scores than placebo at the end of the treatment period, as well as at follow-up.

Clinic Research https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18341417/

Low Level Laser Therapy / Photobiomodulation therapy for Patients with Cervical Disk Hernia

Materials and Treatment Protocols:

Over a 3 year period, 26 rehabilitation department outpatients with chronic neck pain, diagnosed as being caused by cervical disk hernia, underwent treatment applied to the painful area with a 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device delivering at 830 nm in continuous wave, 20.1 J/cm2/point, and three shots were given per session (1 treatment) with twice a week for 4 weeks.

Conclusion:

The present study demonstrates that LLLT or Photobiomodulation therapy was an effective form of treatment for neck and back pain caused by cervical disk hernia, reinforced by postural training.

Clinic Research https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3882355/ 

Low-level Laser Therapy for Burning Mouth Syndrome(BMS)

Case study: Low-level laser therapy in burning mouth syndrome patients

Clinic research:

Laser Treatment Protocol:

The affected areas were irradiated once a week for three consecutive weeks with an infrared laser (λ = 790 nm). The probe was kept in contact with the tissue, and the mucosal surface was scanned during the irradiation. The exposure time was calculated based on the fluence of 6 J/cm(2), the output power of 120 mW, and the area to be treated. Burning intensity was recorded through a visual analog scale before and after the treatment and at the 6-week follow-up. 

Conclusion

Under the investigated parameters, infrared LLLT proved to be a valuable alternative for BMS treatment, providing a significant and lasting reduction in symptoms.

Clinic Research https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21142725/

Low-Level Laser Therapy for Closed Bone Fracture in the Wrist and Hand

Laser Treatment Method:

The laser group underwent a treatment program in which 830 nm LLLT 10 minutes per fracture site) was administered five times per week for 2 weeks.

Result:

LLLT can relieve pain and improve the healing process of CBFs in the human wrist and hand.

Clinic Research, visit https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24649935/

Laser Therapy for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Treatment method:

Adopt the 808nm Laser irradiate the traditional Chinese acu-points on the affected side, once a day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks (N = 43).

Clinic Research Results:

LA may be more effective in the treatment of mild-to-moderate idiopathic CTS in terms of subjective measurement. For patients who fear needle-based treatment, such as acupuncture or local injections, or those who do not opt for early surgical decompression, LA treatment can be considered as an effective and alternative form of acu-points stimulation therapy.

Clinic research, visit https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31502856

Low level Laser Therapy for chronic traumatic brain injury

Case study: Photobiomodulation using low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for patients with chronic traumatic brain injury

Abstract:

Photobiomodulation using low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been tested as a new technique to optimize recovery of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study is to evaluate inhibitory attentional control after 18 sessions of active LLLT and compare with the placebo group (sham LLLT).

Laser Therapy Protocol:

The active LLLT will use an optical device composed of LEDs emitting 632 nm of radiation at the site with full potency of 830 mW. The cranial region with an area of 400 cm2 will be irradiated for 30 min, giving a total dose per session of 3.74 J/cm2. Each patient will be irradiated three times per week for six weeks, totaling 18 sessions. 

Discussion: 

LLLT has been demonstrated as a safe and effective technique in significantly improving the memory, attention, and mood performance in healthy and neurologic patients. We expect that our trial can complement previous finds, as an effective low-cost therapy to improve cognitive sequel after TBI 

Clinic Research https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29310710/

Laser Therapy for Musculoskeletal Pain

Case study: The Use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) For Musculoskeletal Pain

For over forty years, low level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) and LED (light emitting diode) therapy (also known as photobiomodulation) has been shown to reduce inflammation and edema, induce analgesia, and promote healing in a range of musculoskeletal pathologies. The purpose of this paper is to review the use of LLLT for pain, the biochemical mechanisms of action, the dose response curves, and how LLLT may be employed by orthopedic surgeons to improve outcomes and reduce adverse events. 

LLLT parameters

For LLLT to be effective, the irradiation parameters (wavelength, power, power density, pulse parameters, energy density, total energy and time) need to be within certain ranges. The best penetrating wavelengths in the range of 760–850nm and may achieve a light density of 5mW/cm2 at 5cm deep when the beam power is 1Watt and surface density is 5W/cm2. There are four clinical targets for LLLT:

  • The site of injury to promote healing, remodeling and reduce inflammation.
  • Lymph nodes to reduce edema and inflammation.
  • Nerves to induce analgesia.
  • Trigger points to reduce tenderness and relax contracted muscle fibers.

Treatment times per point are in the range of 30 seconds to 1 minute. As little as one point may be treated in simple cases, but as many as 10 to 15 points may be treated for more complex dysfunction such as cervical or lumbar radiculopathy.

Conclusion

One has to be realistic about the therapeutic use of LLLT. The previous discussion has shown that LLLT is beneficial for pain relief and can accelerate the body’s ability to heal itself. LLLT has a long history and strong basic science evidence, which supports its use in pain management. It has few side effects and is well tolerated by the elderly. 

Clinic Research https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4743666/

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